Changes to Nofollow, Rel=”Bull”

Google today (September 10th, 2019) announced some changes to their handling of nofollow. You can read all about it here. In a nutshell, we used to have the nofollow directive.  Google are now moving towards a hint format. That’s important, because a directive is considered a firm command, whereas a hint, is not. We used to have one directive: rel=”nofollow”. Now we have multiple hints:

More Zero Results SERPs Spotted in the Wild

Here we are, less than a week after being reassured that no further queries would end up having their organic search results removed,  and twitter user Geoffrey Weg has spotted another, but this time its a product – NOT an information search: Query:  “Lagavulin 16” (coincidentally, my absolute favorite whisky – it’s as if they knew…)   So I started going through my other favorites,

A brief history of all the times Nofollow didn’t change

Another day, another flip-flop from Google on the functionality and specification of nofollow…  Lets look back at all the times it hasn’t changed in the last decade: Timeline January 2005:  Google, Yahoo & MSN Announce NoFollow As reported in detail by Danny Sullivan (yes, now Google Search Liaison) NoFollow was introduced to combat link spam manipulating results, particularly in comment boxes etc. Here’s the original

Here’s a(nother) Scary Thing about Zero Results Serps

A full 48 hours after my post on zero results serps, and how they could be a fundamental issue to online marketers, we see a great example of how they could be weaponized in the not too distant future. Case in point (and no, this isn’t a Zero Result Serp, but its hard to see why Google wouldn’t roll out to companies phone numbers under

RIP Google, a ‘Search Engine’ from 1998-2018

History Back in the late 90’s, we had a choice of search engines: Altavista, Infoseek, Lycos, Dogpile and probably others I have long since forgotten. Then, with little warning or fanfare, a new competitor, “Google” showed up, offering far better search results, that initially baffled SEOs (an industry that was yet to be named at the time) as to how to optimize for them. One

Is Direct Traffic a Ranking Factor?

Yesterday, SEMrush released an updated version of their June 2017 ranking factors report, again placing Direct Traffic right at the top of the list – stating that its the most important ranking factor for Google. You can (and should) download it here.   For those that may not be familiar with SEMrush, they provide an excellent online set of tools for both SEO market analysis